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Exploring The Work Of Lori Nozick, Where Architecture, Archeology & Evolution Evoke Multilayered Narratives Across History And Time

Exploring The Work Of Lori Nozick, Where Architecture, Archeology & Evolution Evoke Multilayered Narratives Across History And Time


Artist Lori Nozick was born in the northeast US, and lived in New York for 25 years. She currently lives in Miami and has a studio in the Fountainhead Program in Miami, Florida. She holds a BFA from Philadelphia College of Art, and an MFA from Pratt Institute. The artist has exhibited her work in galleries and museums, done site-specific installations, been awarded public art commissions, and has received international, national, state, and foundation grants and fellowships for her work.

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Little Houses Series: ‘Little Blue House’, Reclaimed Wood, Metal, Acrylic. 15″ x 13″ x 10″

Nozick’s work is both highly tactile and deeply referential, with materials evoking our primal earth, to structures we create, to our history and traditions – both specific and universal, existing outside a fixed moment. A tension and balance between security and impermanence echo in the materials chosen and the forms created, which offer a mixing of both hidden narrative and exposed layers, examining ongoing cycles of cohesion and disintegration. Works can seem solid (though they may have hidden vulnerabilities), permeable, ancient and transient, capturing the inherent dynamics of human structure and social and environmental change, both physically and symbolically.

Little Houses Series: ‘Blue Blue House’, Reclaimed Wood, Metal, Acrylic. 15 1/4″ x 10″ x 12″

In 2009 Nozick created a monumental salt sculpture known as ‘Sal, Non Sal 124‘ in Key West, Florida. It was a temporal site specific sculpture installation at Fort Zachary Taylor State Park comprised of 3,600 salt blocks and salt mortar, which consisted of three sections – a tower, column and a wall.

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‘Sal Non Sal 124’ (2009) Salt Sculpture Installation
Temporal site specific sculpture installation. 3,600 salt blocks and salt mortar.
Tower: 8’ x 17’ x 10’. Column: 6’ x 1’ x 1’. Wall: 2’ x 18’ x 4”.
Fort Zachary Taylor Park in Key West, Florida

“One prevalent characteristic is a sense of mutability and, often, decay and dissipation. For example, in Lori Nozick’s work, “Sal, Non Sal 124″, constructed entirely of salt bricks in the form of a castle-type ruin. Throughout the exhibition, the ghostly salt structure will slowly erode and dissolve, a kind of melancholic collapse that simultaneously evokes a sense of the sublime.” –Shamim Momin, (former) Associate Curator, Whitney Museum.

Miami Lighthouse, 2012.
16′ x 17′ x 14′, reclaimed architectural elements, lumber, plexiglass, mirrors, color acrylic panels, colored flourescent lighting.
Featured project at SCOPE Art Fair in Miami
https://vimeo.com/59111421

Nozick was a Featured Artist at SCOPE Art Fair 2012 Miami, she was invited to create a monumental sculpture installation during Miami Art Week. The artist created an anti-architectural structure, ‘Miami Lighthouse‘, intended to evoke house and home, yet utilizing elements lacking their intended functionality: doors that are hung horizontally and above our heads, windows that don’t open, stairs that lead nowhere. The viewer was invited to enter and explore the space, and achieve a moment of contemplation questioning this “place”.

In these works, as art historian and critic Robert C. Morgan has written, “structure signifies an inventory of shapes and elements that pull together even as they move in different directions,” resonating as markers of visual memory. Anti-architectural structures arise as temporary constructions, utilizing elements that conspicuously lack their intended functionality – doors that are hung horizontally far above the floor, windows that cannot open, stairs and walkways that lead nowhere. These often comprise materials that come from the place, site or local environment, including reclaimed architectural elements such as wood, metal, glass, cement, blocks of salt, pigments, impressions of leaves, animal skeletons, fossils, and solar-powered LED lighting.

‘Burning Staircase’, the original Staircase sculpture was 10′ x 6′ x 4′

“I create architectural sculpture that draws from archaeological structures and building methods, historical markers in public space that serve to illuminate real and imagined places, both physical and spiritual, glimpsed in the distance and connecting ancient times with contemporary themes,” explained the artist.

‘Lyon Maisons’, 17″ x 13″, (2019)
Map Drawings on German Luftwaffe 1942 Maps: 4 of 10. All drawings with collage, graphite, chalk, color pencil, stamps.

With a long history of site-specific work, Nozick is interested in the spaces and metaphors created by the sculpture (object) “occupying” a space, through which the dynamic with the viewer becomes paramount. The visitor is invited to enter and explore the space, to achieve a moment of contemplation questioning the reality of this “place” and experience transformation through its scale and unconventional construction. Through this relationship, the archetypal images and forms of the work become a visual and physical language through which the artist explores our relationship to personal and public spaces in culture, communities and nature, both in an immediate sense and throughout history.

‘Straits of Georgia, (2011), Nautical Map, Oil Stick, Watercolor. 36″ x 46″

The artist’s current work investigates and addresses walls, which demarcate both real and imposed boundaries. Deeply resonant with the elemental architecture of Nozick’s work, walls can provide protection and shelter, or can engender separation, isolation and imprisonment, offering no ability to escape. This duality is critical – affecting viewers both physically and mentally, making reference simultaneously, for example, to ancient walled cities and modern gated communities, offering comfort with certain structures reminding us of the homes where we grew up while seeming hostile due to the roughness or impermanence of the materials with which they are made.

Dirt and Chalk Drawings grouping, dimensions variable.
Dirt, Sawdust, Chalk, Copper on Wood Panels

Visit www.lorinozick.com to learn more about this fascinating artist, and on Instagram @lorinozickart / For sales, project inquiries, commissions or general information, please email: lnozickart@aol.com

Additional Press Links:
Wall Street International Magazine, Lori Nozick https://wsimag.com/art/9248-lori-nozick-dislocation
Art and Culture Center/Hollywood https://artandculturecenter.org/lori-nozick-walkabout





Published at Sun, 27 Oct 2019 19:11:06 +0000

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